After 18 years, Deb Koepp is closing her embroidery business. She’s looking forward to starting for a new chapter in her life.
After 18 years, Deb Koepp is closing her embroidery business. She’s looking forward to starting for a new chapter in her life.
Deb Koepp isn’t certain what her next venture entails, when or where it will take place. But after 18 years running her own embroidery business, she’s certain the time has come to turn the page and set a new course.
Koepp recently announced she’s closing Deb’s Embroidery Business at 118 Meridian Street N. in downtown Belle Plaine. Koepp is currently liquidating remaining inventory. She started the business in 1999 and operated it out of her home for five years before moving downtown. Koepp plans to close the doors for good April 22, following the citywide garage sale.
“Eighteen years. Good lord, time flies,” she said. “It doesn’t seem that long. They’ve been 18 good years. It’s just time.”
Koepp has enjoyed working with customers, creating designs that she embroidered onto hats, jackets, sweatshirts, T-shirts and polos. She’s enjoyed the various versions of the Belle Plaine Tiger. Deb’s Embroidery Business has also created sweatshirts for Jordan, Le Sueur-Henderson and other area schools.
Koepp got her start sewing as a youngster growing up in Detroit Lakes, Minn. She learned to sew in 4-H and participated in the local chapter through high school. Her talents and creativity earned her the opportunity to display her fashion creations at the Minnesota State Fair.
Koepp said she’s looking forward to a new chapter, new challenges in her life. She plans to spend more time with her family.
She has sold the two embroidery machines that were the workhorses of her business. Their departure from the business was a production.
The genius of the facility is a wall that separated the room where the machines operated. The wall was built on wheels. When it came time to remove the machines from the store, the wall was swung around to the south side of the shop, allowing the machines to be moved toward the front door. To remove them from the building, the door frame was removed.
“That’s how they came in, too,” Koepp said.
She has long enjoyed the friendships and connections made with customers over the years.
Koepp had one full-time employee. But the demands of entrepreneurship are at times challenging. Owners sweat the details of most every phase of a business.
“There are pros and cons to owning your own business,” Koepp said. “But mostly, it’s been good. I’ve enjoyed it.”